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Post Tenebras Lux

June 30, 2013

directed by Carlos Reygadas, 2012

Post Tenebras Lux

The body of work put forth by Mexican auteur Carlos Reygadas has been nothing short of polarizing. At 42, and now with four features under his belt, Reygadas has been earmarked as one of the most ambitious and daring filmmakers working in modern cinema and in the arthouse. With his latest, Post Tenebras Lux (Latin for After Darkness, Light), his status grows; this very personal and seemingly scattered autobiographical account should further mystify the Reygadas faithful and detractors alike. As a symbol of creative ambition, few come close to matching Reygadas, an artist unaware of boundaries and safe zones within the medium. His cinema, and especially Post Tenebras Lux, is miraculous, almost overwhelmingly flowing with flaws and passion. For better or worse, his natural instincts depict a constant beauty amid tragedy and turmoil.

Reygadas sure knows how to open a film, even going back to the mesmerizing painterly-like bookends of Silent Light. Here, we track a young girl wandering around a wet and muddy field in the Mexican countryside at dusk. She’s surrounded by cows, dogs, and the foreboding aura of what lingers on the horizon. The dark tinge of the night sky slowly fades in and out, revealing the title of the film; her tiny face and innocent gaze are now shrouded in darkness. The girl (Rut), along with her brother (Eleazar) in the film, turns out to be the real life children of Reygadas, and the two young siblings parented by Juan and Natalia, the family at the center of the film.

Read full review at Sound on Sight

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One comment

  1. […] « Post Tenebras Lux […]



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