Posts Tagged ‘Fantastic Fest 2012’

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Wrong

September 25, 2012

directed by Quentin Dupieux, 2012

It was perhaps a huge disservice to not have seen Dupieux’s Rubber before diving into his latest effort. Certainly, there are those tickled and perhaps even moved by what Dupieux represents as a filmmaker, but the guy feels oddly too imaginative for his own good. Not only that, but his vision fails to conjure up any type of creative appeal that we haven’t seen before.Wrong is both familiar and foreign, as to override all expectations, enveloping the viewer in a dizzying stream of inertness. It’s mainly a mad exercise without the slightest hint of its destination, with Dupieux as the conductor.

Full review at Sound on Sight

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Holy Motors

September 23, 2012

directed by Leos Carax, 2012

If you’ve never heard of Leos Carax, Holy Motors might not be the best way to make the French director’s acquaintance – or maybe, just maybe, it wouldn’t matter much at all. Having not produced a feature-length film since 1999′s Pola X, Carax’s latest is an oddly euphoric plunge into madness and the bizarre. It stirs the imagination unlike any other film this year, and is likely to take the cake in regards to producing the zaniest, most absurdly loopy film-going experience in recent memory. Too cool for the likes of Nanni Moretti (President of this year’s Cannes jury), the film was met with both high praise and waives of bewilderment at Cannes, signifying that Carax is indeed back.

Full review at Sound on Sight

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Room 237

September 22, 2012

directed by Rodney Ascher, 2012

Room 237 is a potent, one-of-a-kind exploration into obsession and fanaticism that calls into question the underlying value of art and those who seek to unearth it. Whether or not you’re a fan of Kubrick and his films is moot. Rodney Ascher’s documentary serves up mind-boggling theory after another, absorbing the viewer into a bubble of references and theories surrounding Kubrick’s 1980 horror classic The Shining. Broken into nine sections, Room 237 is chalk-full of altered images, stock footage, and snippets from the rest of Kubrick’s oeuvre. Its structure and cohesiveness very much plays like a thrown together college assignment on the auteur, but with enough ideas to keep us entertained, and even enthralled throughout its duration.

Full review at Sound on Sight